6.1. Introduction

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Throughout this last chapter, we will summarise the main ideas and the most important phrases and guidelines included in the previous chapters.

The metal sector in Europe has been and continues to be one of the main forces driving the European economy.

Throughout history, the sector has undergone important sectoral restructuring that has radically transformed the way companies are made and managed.

Where in the past we had intense labour processes, today the technology applied to processes means that we need a large number of people less often. Today to produce the same or more, a tenth of the work is necessary, which is due to technological integration, improvement of production processes and improvement of business processes.

The sector is also experiencing changes in the way in which companies are managed, as well as in the way in which they interact internally and with other interest groups (clients, suppliers, society, etc.). Companies are initiating cultural change processes based on the participation and shared responsibilities of all the people who make up the organisation.

In the case of the metal industry sector, that despite being a clearly innovative sector, remains a traditional sector in certain managerial aspects, and this type of cooperative culture can, in some cases, be considered a challenge.

But what is corporate culture?

The most complete definition is that of R. Soria, ‘an important element to boost the competitiveness of the company, which recognises the intellectual abilities, work and exchange of ideas between groups. By allowing the exchange of ideas, it facilitates the carrying out of the company’s activities, creating a climate of companionship and dedication towards work at the same time’.

It can be said that working with a participative model entails strong cultural roots based on the participation of people within the organisation and around it. It is necessary for companies and their employees to have a culture based on collaboration and cooperation between different interest groups integrated in their DNA.

Some factors that define shared and participatory management:

  • Change in the entire organisation’s culture, including the owner.
  • Transformation of management, from director to leader
  • Joint project, company and workers
  • Shared and joint values, company and people
  • Transparent and fluid information
  • Self-managed and multidisciplinary teams
  • Employee participation in company management

 
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Module overview
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Processes